About Us

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Eagle Eye’s goal is to make a proof of concept airship that can operate in the Martian atmosphere while still being fairly simple to operate and relatively cheap to produce. Our end goal is for this project to be used by a space organization either commercial or federal to assist in spatial body exploration. Pictured from Left to Right: Nicholas Hendrickson, Zachary Koehler, Erik Gruber, Alec Wagner, Paul Hentges, Bruno Rangel-Huerta, Kaleb Cornick, Josue Oyervides, Andrew Eschweiler, Anthony Lazzerini, Jared Witt, William Steppick, Jared Danner, Christopher Johannsen, Cory Miller, Robert Zartman, Ryan Whitener, Jacob Cline, Christopher Kosirowski  

Project Mission Statement

To build an airborne vehicle that can assist in planetary exploration of Mars where traditional rovers or humans cannot go.

Background Information

Eagle Eye was started in the fall of 2014. The initial idea was conceived over the summer by former Project lead Dillyn Mumme. At the beginning of the fall term Dillyn brought his idea to Preston Waymire for discussion. After refining the idea and doing more research the two approached Matt Nelson to propose the idea as an M:2:I project. In that first semester the group did mostly research and initial designing of the hexacopter prototype, as well as much recruiting to expand their small 5 man team.  The group finalized the design as well as constructed a foam model and did research on how to work with composites for construction. The group then lost their adviser and would be picked up by Dr.Wlezein. After some restructuring the group decided to start from scratch with their design and focus on the rotorcraft being on Mars. The spring of 2016 the group double in size and started the design of a coaxial rotorcraft. During the semester preliminary aerogel testing was completed as well as a solidworks model of the prototype vehicle. Over the summer a group worked on coding and building the recovery system and developing the ribs and spar structure for the blades. As Feasibility analysis has provided evidence that a coaxial rotorcraft will no longer be feasible, due to increasing complexity with fabrication and operation. As of August 2017, the team has elected to shift the project's focus to designing an airship, which uses buoyant force as the primary force contributing to lift, rather than rotating blades. Last semester Eagle Eye was working toward construction of our prototype airship. This includes construction of the gondola, envelope, motors and other systems. This allowed us to perform inside and low altitude testing with our airship to ensure our control systems and electronics work the way intended. A goal achieved was the ground pressure control system test, which allowed controlled accent and decent as well as provide a safe way to bring our craft down from high altitude testing. Throughout the semester Eagle Eye was able to design and construct an initial main structure that includes a gondola and envelopes to secure the balloons. However, during our most recent test flight we encountered difficulties with the envelope regarding our balloon fill up process. Our response to this issue has been to redesign and re-approach securing the balloons. This semester has focused on creating new procedures that will allow for consistent and successful launches so that we may focus on creating tangible results with our test flights.

CURRENT GOALS

The main goal for the Fall 2018 semester is to modify the systems created during the previous semester in order to ensure that a tether flight test will be successful. The tethered flight test will be performed twice, one inside the Howe Atrium, and another outside. The purpose of having two tests is so that we can test and validate different subsystems. The test inside the Howe Atrium will allow us to ensure our structure is stable and capable of supporting the predicted loads, our avionics and control systems are functional and predictable, and our filling procedures are safe and consistent. This test will be done at a few feet and will allow all three teams to test certain parts of their system. The design team will be able to ensure their structure can withstand the loads predicted. Avionics will be able to test their GPS system and manipulate any flaws found. Fabrication will determine if their envelope design will hold the balloons appropriately. Overall the previous semester was a major success. All teams were able to complete their assigned milestones and an final airship was constructed. This was the first time all three teams were able to implement their systems into one complete craft. It was proven that the craft was able to withstand all loads presented as well as maneuver to the desired location based on GPS coordinates. The tethered flight test was not a success, however, the balloons were found to be more sensitive than expected. The envelope was not the most effective design and will need to be improved before further test can occur.

Final Airship Design

FUTURE GOALS

Going into next semester and long term goals we need to refine our systems and test the airship at high altitudes.

 Organization Chart

Eagle Eye Leadership:
Project Lead Project Advisers
Ryan Whitener Dr. Kim and Matt Nelson
Eagle Eye Team leads:
Eagle Eye Sub-Team Team Lead
Avionics Christopher Johannsen
Design William Steppick
Fabrication Cory Miller
Eagle Eye Team Members:
Design Team Fabrication Team Avionics Team
William Steppick Cory Miller Christopher Johannsen
Kaleb Cornick Erik Gruber Jared Danner
Paul Hentges Christopher Kosirowski Andrew Eschweiler
Zachary Koehler Anthony Lazzerini Jacob Cline
Jared Witt Nicholas Hendrickson Robert Zartman
Josue Oyervides Alec Wagner Bruno Rangel

Eagle Eye

PROJECT OVERVIEW

Eagle Eye’s goal is to make a proof of concept vehicle that can operate in Martian atmosphere while still being fairly simple to operate and relatively cheap to produce. Our end goal is for this project to be used by a space organization either commercial or federal to assist in spatial body exploration.

Eagle Eye Leadership:
Project Lead Project Adviser
Ryan Whitener Dr. Kim and Matthew Nelson
Eagle Eye Team leads:
Eagle Eye Sub-Team Team Lead
Avionics Christopher Johannsen
Design William Steppick
Fabrication Cory Miller

 

MISSION STATEMENT

To build an airborne vehicle that can assist in planetary exploration of Mars where traditional rovers or humans cannot go.

 

Fall 2018 Avionics Progress
40%
Fall 2018 Design Progress
45%
Fall 2018 Fabrication Progress
40%

Eagle Eye Teams

Avionics Team

Design Team

Fabrication Team

more info

About Us
PROJECT OVERVIEW Eagle Eye’s goal is to make a proof of concept airship that can operate in the Mar
Avionics Team
The Avionics Team is Focused on the development and testing of the  avionics components; this includ
Design Team
The Design team is tasked with the responsibility of completing theoretical design of the vehicle. T...
Fabrication Team
The Fabrication Team is tasked with the fabrication and assembly of the Eagle Eye vehicle. This incl...
Project Organization
PROJECT STRUCTURE Eagle Eye Leadership: Project Lead Project Adviser Dillyn Mumme M...
Project Goals
CURRENT GOALS This semester Eagle Eye will be working toward finalizing the construction of our pro...

OUR FACTS

99
Maximum Altitude (ft)
99
Aggregate flight time (hours)
99
Team members
99
Cups of Coffee

We are graciously funded by

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Latest blogs

139-A Launch
October 19, 2016
Photos from 139-A Launch: HABET Launch Team
139-A Launch
October 19, 2016
Photos from 139-A Launch: Platform Team
139-A Launch
October 19, 2016
Photos from 139-A Launch: Mechanical Team
139-A Launch
October 19, 2016
Photos from 139-A Launch: Avionics Team

Contact Us

  • Contact us on the detail given below

  • Iowa State University: Department of Aerospace Engineering
  • jbellis@iastate.edu
  • www.m2i.aere.iastate.edu/eagleeye/